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philliplight:

A cranky mermaid whose not afraid to cut a betta…fish…heh heh fish pun

philliplight:

A cranky mermaid whose not afraid to cut a betta…fish…heh heh fish pun

(via shikseh)

sciencefriday:

neaq:

Whales!

Photo and caption: gregjw

The humpback whales known as “North Star” and “Hippocampus”. These two whales have been reportedly swimming together for a few weeks now, at Stellwagen Bank. Fun fact: those bumps on their heads are big hair follicles, called tubercles. 

Whales!

saveflowers1:

Art by Jessie Willcox Smith (c 1916) from the book, THE WATER BABIES.

saveflowers1:

Art by Jessie Willcox Smith (c 1916) from the book, THE WATER BABIES.

(via shikseh)

neaq:

#SharkWeek Takeover by @BrianSkerry: My hope is that humans, who clearly have the capacity for change and to do great things, will evolve to a point where we no longer decimate fellow species with which we share this planet. #amazing #ocean #animals #savesharks

neaq:

#SharkWeek Takeover by @BrianSkerry: My hope is that humans, who clearly have the capacity for change and to do great things, will evolve to a point where we no longer decimate fellow species with which we share this planet. #amazing #ocean #animals #savesharks

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(via scishow)

scishow:

Why Don’t Sharks Have Bones?

Eat facts, Shark Week! Hank takes you on a tour of the shark’s amazing anatomy, including the many adaptations that made it a great predator — despite not having any bones.

explainers-nysci:

Fight your Fear with Five Shark Facts:
1: Approximately 3.17 sharks are killed by humans every second while only less than 6 humans are killed by sharks every year. 
2: Sharks are relatively high in the food chain and keep populations of prey in check. 
3: Sharks have roamed the ocean for almost 400 million years, even before the dinosaurs. 
4: Your chances of encountering a Shark is very rare. You are more likely to get struck with lightning than to encounter a Shark.
5: Sharks are a slow growing species that don’t breed often. They are vulnerable to extinction.
Sharks have a bad rep above the ocean. Their creepy grins, appetite for meat and sharp teeth make it hard to appreciate them. While it may seem like they are out to get us, sharks are a magnificent species that need to be protected.
Sources

explainers-nysci:

Fight your Fear with Five Shark Facts:

1: Approximately 3.17 sharks are killed by humans every second while only less than 6 humans are killed by sharks every year. 

2: Sharks are relatively high in the food chain and keep populations of prey in check. 

3: Sharks have roamed the ocean for almost 400 million years, even before the dinosaurs. 

4: Your chances of encountering a Shark is very rare. You are more likely to get struck with lightning than to encounter a Shark.

5: Sharks are a slow growing species that don’t breed often. They are vulnerable to extinction.

Sharks have a bad rep above the ocean. Their creepy grins, appetite for meat and sharp teeth make it hard to appreciate them. While it may seem like they are out to get us, sharks are a magnificent species that need to be protected.

Sources

reptilesrevolution:

Asian Water Monitor. 

reptilesrevolution:

Asian Water Monitor. 

(via shikseh)

philliplight:

A cranky mermaid whose not afraid to cut a betta…fish…heh heh fish pun

philliplight:

A cranky mermaid whose not afraid to cut a betta…fish…heh heh fish pun

(via shikseh)

sciencefriday:

neaq:

Whales!

Photo and caption: gregjw

The humpback whales known as “North Star” and “Hippocampus”. These two whales have been reportedly swimming together for a few weeks now, at Stellwagen Bank. Fun fact: those bumps on their heads are big hair follicles, called tubercles. 

Whales!

saveflowers1:

Art by Jessie Willcox Smith (c 1916) from the book, THE WATER BABIES.

saveflowers1:

Art by Jessie Willcox Smith (c 1916) from the book, THE WATER BABIES.

(via shikseh)

neaq:

#SharkWeek Takeover by @BrianSkerry: My hope is that humans, who clearly have the capacity for change and to do great things, will evolve to a point where we no longer decimate fellow species with which we share this planet. #amazing #ocean #animals #savesharks

neaq:

#SharkWeek Takeover by @BrianSkerry: My hope is that humans, who clearly have the capacity for change and to do great things, will evolve to a point where we no longer decimate fellow species with which we share this planet. #amazing #ocean #animals #savesharks

artandsciencejournal:

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(via scishow)

scishow:

Why Don’t Sharks Have Bones?

Eat facts, Shark Week! Hank takes you on a tour of the shark’s amazing anatomy, including the many adaptations that made it a great predator — despite not having any bones.

explainers-nysci:

Fight your Fear with Five Shark Facts:
1: Approximately 3.17 sharks are killed by humans every second while only less than 6 humans are killed by sharks every year. 
2: Sharks are relatively high in the food chain and keep populations of prey in check. 
3: Sharks have roamed the ocean for almost 400 million years, even before the dinosaurs. 
4: Your chances of encountering a Shark is very rare. You are more likely to get struck with lightning than to encounter a Shark.
5: Sharks are a slow growing species that don’t breed often. They are vulnerable to extinction.
Sharks have a bad rep above the ocean. Their creepy grins, appetite for meat and sharp teeth make it hard to appreciate them. While it may seem like they are out to get us, sharks are a magnificent species that need to be protected.
Sources

explainers-nysci:

Fight your Fear with Five Shark Facts:

1: Approximately 3.17 sharks are killed by humans every second while only less than 6 humans are killed by sharks every year. 

2: Sharks are relatively high in the food chain and keep populations of prey in check. 

3: Sharks have roamed the ocean for almost 400 million years, even before the dinosaurs. 

4: Your chances of encountering a Shark is very rare. You are more likely to get struck with lightning than to encounter a Shark.

5: Sharks are a slow growing species that don’t breed often. They are vulnerable to extinction.

Sharks have a bad rep above the ocean. Their creepy grins, appetite for meat and sharp teeth make it hard to appreciate them. While it may seem like they are out to get us, sharks are a magnificent species that need to be protected.

Sources

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